welcome to my new blog

welcome to my new blog

theonion:

Sources: Hackers Vandalized Drudge Report For Last 15 Years: Full Report

theonion:

Sources: Hackers Vandalized Drudge Report For Last 15 Years: Full Report

(via wilwheaton)

youmightfindyourself:

Power move.

Working with someone else’s name, some clothes, and a dry-cleaning receipt, the sleuths at the Atlanta Mail Recovery Center once returned the World Series ring of major league pitcher Pedro Borbon.

http://www.esquire.com/print-this/post-office-business-trouble-0213?page=all

(via bbook)

okadamok:

I’ve had these moments as a kid.  
christiannightmarestoo:

Nobody home: A young Nazarene kid thinks he’s been Left Behind at the Rapture
I was raised in the Nazarene Church in small town Illinois. Around 1970-71, the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association came out with a movie about the Rapture, I think it was called A Thief in the Night. Our small youth group saw it at the local theatre. It freaked me out, to say the least.
So, about six months later I was walking home from a friend’s house. Normal day, dad should be at home from work and mom should be cooking supper… except no one was home. It was eerily quiet. I wandered through the empty house; “Mom? Dad?” Suddenly, a cold chill swept over me. Had I been Left Behind? Surely not. I believed in God, maybe I wasn’t the best Christian in the world but I was only 11, I was trying. Increasingly panicked, I ran outside. All was quiet. I started thinking about others at my church. Maybe I could find out if they were still here. I saw my neighbor, but she was Catholic, so that didn’t prove anything. I didn’t know if they would be raptured or not, but something told me probably not. So I had to find a Nazarene. The problem was, we were the only family in our town that went to the church, except for the preacher and his kids. I was increasingly frantic and panicked. My heart raced, with my mind going even faster.
Just as I was starting to run the six blocks to the parsonage, my parents pulled up into the driveway. I acted nonchalant and walked to the backyard, but the wave of relief that washed over me was quickly supplanted by an intense anger. At my parents, at the church, the preacher… and at God. That day started me on a path away from the Nazarene church. It took another 25 years, but I finally walked away and have not looked back. I have found a Christian group that doesn’t teach any of those things, and is firmly a liberal Christian tradition. I wish I would have had that when I was young.
My mother just passed away a couple of months ago, and I will never again darken the door of a Nazarene church…. or any of the other evangelical or fundamentalist churches. I believe in God and in the Bible, but I also believe that those ‘Talibaptists’ (evangelicals) are a great danger to American democracy and to the Bible itself, as their war mongering and bizarre doctrines are turning people away from the simple Gospel espoused by Jesus and encapsulated in the Golden Rule. - Anonymous

okadamok:

I’ve had these moments as a kid.  

christiannightmarestoo:

Nobody home: A young Nazarene kid thinks hes been Left Behind at the Rapture

I was raised in the Nazarene Church in small town Illinois. Around 1970-71, the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association came out with a movie about the Rapture, I think it was called A Thief in the Night. Our small youth group saw it at the local theatre. It freaked me out, to say the least.

So, about six months later I was walking home from a friends house. Normal day, dad should be at home from work and mom should be cooking supper… except no one was home. It was eerily quiet. I wandered through the empty house; Mom? Dad? Suddenly, a cold chill swept over me. Had I been Left Behind? Surely not. I believed in God, maybe I wasn’t the best Christian in the world but I was only 11, I was trying. Increasingly panicked, I ran outside. All was quiet. I started thinking about others at my church. Maybe I could find out if they were still here. I saw my neighbor, but she was Catholic, so that didn’t prove anything. I didn’t know if they would be raptured or not, but something told me probably not. So I had to find a Nazarene. The problem was, we were the only family in our town that went to the church, except for the preacher and his kids. I was increasingly frantic and panicked. My heart raced, with my mind going even faster.

Just as I was starting to run the six blocks to the parsonage, my parents pulled up into the driveway. I acted nonchalant and walked to the backyard, but the wave of relief that washed over me was quickly supplanted by an intense anger. At my parents, at the church, the preacher… and at God. That day started me on a path away from the Nazarene church. It took another 25 years, but I finally walked away and have not looked back. I have found a Christian group that doesn’t teach any of those things, and is firmly a liberal Christian tradition. I wish I would have had that when I was young.

My mother just passed away a couple of months ago, and I will never again darken the door of a Nazarene church…. or any of the other evangelical or fundamentalist churches. I believe in God and in the Bible, but I also believe that those ‘Talibaptists’ (evangelicals) are a great danger to American democracy and to the Bible itself, as their war mongering and bizarre doctrines are turning people away from the simple Gospel espoused by Jesus and encapsulated in the Golden Rule. - Anonymous

vintageblackglamour:

Zora Neale Hurston, born on this day in 1891, wrote these words in her 1950 essay, What White Publishers Won’t Print. ”For various reasons, the average, struggling, non-morbid Negro is the best-kept secret in America. His revelation to the public is the thing needed to do away with that feeling of difference which inspires fear, and which ever expresses itself in dislike. It is inevitable that this knowledge will destroy many illusions and romantic traditions which America probably likes to have around. But then, we have no record of anybody sinking into a lingering death on finding out that there was no Santa Claus. The old world will take it in its stride. The realization that Negroes are no better nor no worse, and at times just as bonny as everybody else, will hardly kill off the population of the nation.”  This photo was taken on November 9, 1934 in Chicago by Carl Van Vechten. Via Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library

vintageblackglamour:

Zora Neale Hurston, born on this day in 1891, wrote these words in her 1950 essay, What White Publishers Won’t Print. ”For various reasons, the average, struggling, non-morbid Negro is the best-kept secret in America. His revelation to the public is the thing needed to do away with that feeling of difference which inspires fear, and which ever expresses itself in dislike. It is inevitable that this knowledge will destroy many illusions and romantic traditions which America probably likes to have around. But then, we have no record of anybody sinking into a lingering death on finding out that there was no Santa Claus. The old world will take it in its stride. The realization that Negroes are no better nor no worse, and at times just as bonny as everybody else, will hardly kill off the population of the nation.”  This photo was taken on November 9, 1934 in Chicago by Carl Van Vechten. Via Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library

3eanuts:

January 3, 1969 — see The Complete Peanuts 1967-1970

Forever reblog.

3eanuts:

January 3, 1969 — see The Complete Peanuts 1967-1970

Forever reblog.

nationalpost:

First Nation leaders to meet as Idle No More movement ‘becoming more volatile’
First Nations leaders are meeting today to clarify the demands of hunger-striker Chief Theresa Spence, in the hopes of getting closer to a resolution of recent unrest.

National Chief Shawn Atleo is meeting several key regional chiefs from the area surrounding Spence’s Attawapiskat reserve in northern Ontario.

Spence’s spokespeople said Wednesday in a written statement that the situation “is becoming more volatile” with each passing day that Prime Minister Stephen Harper doesn’t meet with Spence.

At the same time, Atleo has issued what he calls an urgent invitation to Prime Minister Stephen Harper and Gov. Gen. David Johnston to meet chiefs on Jan. 24 _ the one-year anniversary of Harper’s summit with First Nations. (The Canadian Press)

(via utnereader)